Rathfinny Wine Estate

The Rise of the Influencer

Nowadays, I can’t take a bite of my meal without snapping it on Facebook, Instagram or Twitter first. I’m passive-aggressively outraged if a dining companion tucks into their starter while I’m still trying to find my best lighting. The #nofilters photo of my Eggs Florentine at an Insta-friendly cafe, which only took 110 dry-runs to get right, followed by #blessed and the praying-hands emoji…is the depressing reality of where it’s all come to. Bear with me, it gets more cheerful.

Putting together the invitee list for our big Rathfinny launch in London, now set for April 2018 (available to purchase in June), got me thinking. It struck me that if this is to go off with a #bang, we’d need to invite some influencers along. Only thing is, I had no idea what influencers were, where they lived, what they did, was I one? I then realised, neither of my twitter followers had ever retweeted any of my posts, so I couldn’t be. 

Read Rob Buckhaven's Article

Gin O’clock

Somewhere in the world it must be time for a gin.  It would appear that the rise in popularity of micro breweries and artisan beers has made way for a wave of gin.

Those from Sussex may have seen our glorious white gin bottles in local stores, bars or hotels.  Named after the iconic Seven Sisters but gin from these parts is not a new phenomenon. The land that folds over the top of the Seven Sisters cliffs between Seaford and Birling Gap is knows as Crowlink.  Genuine Crowlink Gin was the drink in the 1800s in London.  It was illegally imported gin which could be legally sold over the bar.  Many landlords even resorted to placing the word Crowlink on their barrels as pure PR to improve sales, even if it wasn’t the real deal.  The smuggling trade was of huge importance in this part of East Sussex and many of the larger houses that adorn the landscape have been ‘funded’ from the illegal import of alcohol.  Ours is not illegal but we do hope it continues to be the gin to drink!

Read Richard's Article

Taxing issues

Dear Mr Hammond

Is it fair or wise to penalise a British industry that is growing and taking on the world? Would we charge higher taxes on Whisky or Scottish woolens than on Vodka or Chinese jumpers? Would we charge higher VAT on British made luxury cars than lower priced ones?

So why do we charge higher rates of Excise Duty on sparkling wine than still wine in the UK?

It’s a little-known fact that we pay 28% more of Excise Duty per bottle on sparkling wine than on still wine – £2.74 and ‘just’ £2.16 respectively. Plus VAT of 20% …

I say ‘just’ because in the rest of Europe Excise Duty on wine is generally 8-10p per bottle! It’s cheaper to buy most wines, even English

Read Mark's Article

Harvest completed

 

We’ve finished our harvest and it was completely wonderful.  Not only did we have a bumper crop, over twice what was harvested last year, but we had so many other things to celebrate.  As Mark mentioned in a previous blog we had a super team of local pickers come and join us.  Mark was away the first morning of harvest so it fell to me to do a rousing, welcoming speech.  

Read Sarah's Article

WE ARE OPEN AS USUAL

Alfriston is undergoing essential mains water replacement and there is no through access from 3rd January – 30th May. Click below for alternative routes:

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