Rathfinny Wine Estate

Royal Wedding and English Wines

Sarah here – as usual very behind with my blogging!  Probably due to sleep deprivation as my husband keeps waking me up at some ungodly hour to discuss some new thought of his or, even worse, to excitedly shove a graph in my befuddled face and ask me to show the same enthusiasm he has for sales of sparkling wine the world over!

Anyway, lots has been going on ….. and here are a few highlights.

Chapel Down – Frazer Thompson, CEO of Chapel Down, sent us a lovely welcoming email to the world of wine a few months ago, inviting us down for lunch.  We had a brilliant time with him, me in particular, as he showed us all over the site and explained every part of the process, which I have never taken much notice of in the past when visiting vineyards, preferring (as is my wont!) to focus on the end result.  We finished off with an excellent lunch (the best soup I have had in a long time) and a tasting of some of their wines and bubbly.

Without pretending to know, I’d say the following:-

Bacchus white wine – I really liked this (and I have drifted away from white wines with age (mine, not the wine!) finding them too acidic) – the smell was heavenly and my first thoughts were elderflower and hedgerows.  Honestly!  So proud of myself when Frazer said exactly the same before I’d said a word.

Flint dry – I liked this too – very clear and light and eminently drinkable.

Of course my favourite was the Chapel Down Sparkling but here I fall down as I can’t remember which one we had.  I do know though, that I have a nice bottle of the Union to celebrate with tomorrow on the …

Royal Wedding.  Can my husband really wield such influence?  He’d like to think so since he wields little in the domestic arena.  Check out this story to see just why we should all be patriotically drinking our own English wines.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1380903/ROYAL-WEDDING-2011-English-wine-table-Kate-Williams-big-day–costs-8-50-bottle.html

Well done Chapel Down!

Finally, we recently welcomed the English National Trust and Natural England to Rathfinny and we will be working closely with them, in our new National Park, to save our chalk downland meadow with the help of ponies.  More on that later!

Read Sarah's Article

Praying for rain…

Like everyone else in the UK I am enjoying this delightful warm spring weather and wonderful sunshine. It is warmer in southern England than most of Spain. However, we are desperate for some rain.

The weather station at Rathfinny has recorded just 8.5mm of rain since the beginning of March.

http://www.weatherlink.com/user/rathfinny/index.php?view=main&headers=1

We planted our cover crop of mustard seed two weeks ago and although it has come up in some areas, in others the field is still bare. We also have to water the trees in the windbreaks every few days to keep them alive.

However, the really big news this week is that Cameron Roucher, our Vineyard manager, and his wife Nikki and children have arrived at Rathfinny from New Zealand.  Liz is particularly pleased to see him as he can take over the watering of the trees!

So I’m enjoying this lovely unusual spring weather but praying for rain.

Read Mark's Article

Royal Wedding wine list…

I heard some disappointing news last week. I had not received an invite to the Royal Wedding much to Mrs Driver’s dismay! No, seriously, at the Royal Wedding of William and Catherine they won’t be toasting the happy couple with English Sparkling wine but with French Champagne. Quel horreur!

Given that Nyetimber’s classic cuvee 2003 won the best sparkling wine on the planet award last year, Ridgeview won the Decanter award 2010 for the best sparkling wine and Camel Valley won the best Rose sparkling wine in the world (including Champagne) award in the Bolcini Del Mondo international wine awards in Verona, I was a bit surprised to hear that the Royal couple have ditched the best in the world to toast the happy couple with Pol Roger instead of the best of English.

We have a right Royal opportunity to show the rest of the world what only the experts seem to know – that we are producing the best sparkling wine in the world, right here in England.

So I asked a friend of mine why this might be, perhaps they don’t have enough to supply such a big party? I doubt it, Nyetimber, Ridgeview or Camel Valley must surely have enough to supply a party of 350 people at Buckingham Palace. Is it too expensive? Surely our Royal family can afford the best and English sparkling wine is a bargain compared to French Champagne, I doubt that that is the reason. So why has Prince Charles, who is normally such supporter of English produce deserted our fine English wine in favour of the French? Perhaps it’s the new entente cordial, to appease our French cousins as their French Champagne slips into obscurity. Will they have Dijon not English mustard on the table? Perhaps they will drive to the church in a Peugeot not the customary Rolls Royce? Under William’s rule will fish and chips be served with French wine vinegar instead of English malt vinegar?

So I spoke to Kevin the vineyard manager at Plumpton college to ask him why such a decision could have been taken. Incidentally he also makes wine at Bluebell Vineyard, who have just got their sparkling rose onto the wine list at the Savoy group after winning a blind tasting. He couldn’t understand why, in this country, he’s from New Zealand, we seem to talk down the best of our English produce and talk up overseas produced goods. It would never happen in New Zealand or in France and definitely not in America. Can you imagine the American President holding a party and not serving American Champagne (by the way they get away with calling American produced sparkling wine Champagne, can’t remember why?).

So I hope that the person I was speaking to is misinformed and that Prince William and Catherine will be toasted in with the best sparkling wine in the world – which as we all know is now from England, not France.

Perhaps it’s not too late and we can change their minds?

Read Mark's Article

The National Park, The weather and The BBC

We are now officially sitting nicely within the South Downs National Park. As of Friday the 1st of April the South Downs became England’s biggest National Park and we are one of its biggest and most beautiful farms.

The start up was launched locally at Burling Gap and I trotted along to have a cuppa and listen to the speakers. I was surprised to see so many there. Not surprisingly there was lots of enthusiasm for the protection and promotion of this area of outstanding natural beauty and its cultural heritage. It came from various quarters, the National Trust of course who have always played a significant part in both conservation and heritage; The Ramblers association who are users and enthusiasts, Wealdon and Eastbourne district Councillors and the National Farmers Union. It was rather interesting to listen to all the pro conservationists talk (or in the case of The Ramblers, ramble)  followed by the NFU chairwoman Gillian Van De Meer who championed the views of the agricultural sector saying that conservation was all very well but if we don’t farm you don’t eat! I couldn’t help feeling she was right, that it was important to strike a balance between the need to economically produce food and conservation. Let’s face it the heritage of this area is farming and farmers have always been protectors of the land.

Enough of the eco-politics! I have a much more interesting story relating to the launch of the park. It started with an E mail from Richard our communications chap the previous afternoon to let me know that the BBC South East will be there in an hour so to film the view of the Cuckmere Valley from the farm for a feature on the new South Downs National Park.

rathfinnyestate.posterous-59

It normally looks like this.

I look out of the window and the visibility is about 2 metres at a push, there is no view. Oh well they will have to find another spot I think so I head out with my fog lights on driving carefully at 2 miles an hour down the farm track only to nearly collide head-on with Yvette from BBC SE and her camera man. We say hi , laugh about the fog and the decision is made that they will sit it out and wait for it to lift , they have 4 hours for it to clear, it will be fine. I head off and they sit outside the farm house like a couple of under cover cops in the back of their mini film editing unit sorting out the feature. Long story short,-I return- they are still there-,visibility is worse and they have only 40 minutes before the show goes live to goodness knows how many and I have been talked into giving an interview about the positives of the National Park to fill the slot.

As you can imagine the first thing I do is rush to the make-up bag and mirror. It’s drizzling steadily outside so I choose waterproof everything to reduce the risk of looking like a panda on national television. Then it’s straight to the wardrobe for the country park look (also waterproof) – I’m good to go and we have 20mins left. Yvette tells me the questions and asks me what I’m going to say, good point, I haven’t a clue my minds gone to scrambled eggs so I ring Mark in London and he gives me the Rathfinny line which I write on the back of an envelope. 15 mins to go and it is decided we will film it from the bottom of the farm where the visibility has lifted to a whopping 10metres- I do a personal best down the farm track and with only 5 mins to go I’m rehearsing my speech in my best BBC voice into the rear view mirror of my truck while Yvette is gesturing for me to get in place and then, before I know it, I am beamed live into the living rooms of the South East of England. Fame at last!

(If you want to see the clip it is on our website)

Read Liz's Article

Budget Deficit and all that…

Forgive me, but with my ex-hedge fund manager’s hat on I can’t let the end of the tax year slip by without a comment on the recent budget and the march against cuts in London.

My son keeps asking me to try and explain “what’s going on in the world at the moment” because he’s at University and wants to be able to give the other side of the argument. He’s like that. He’s studying Philosophy and English, and he’ll make a good Barrister on day, as he’ll argue the other side on anything.

So here goes, and with a health warning, I’m not a politician. I studied economics and I hold no deep political views.

However, I am frankly shocked that Ed Balls can get away with saying that we can afford to stop or moderate the program of cuts announced by the coalition government last year. Step back and look at where we were in May last year. The dollar was hovering at $1.45 to the pound, having fallen from over $2 dollars to the pound in 2008 and the Euro, that battered currency, was heading towards €1 to the pound. We were on the brink of a currency crisis.

If the new government, whoever was chosen, had not instigated some radical cuts to expenditure then the international community, who buy our debt, could well have walked away from the UK, leaving the pound to collapse and the cost of our borrowing to rise.

So let’s talk about the deficit. Firstly, the deficit is not our government debt; it is the difference between our income (tax revenue) and expenditure. If you or I started spending 10% more than we earned, and we had already borrowed a substantial sum of money, the bank would probably come knocking on the door and asking when we would be rectifying this. It is the same with national governments. The banker is the global financial community who buy our government debt, gilts, treasury bonds, they are all names for the same thing. Our deficit is huge, it is forecast to rise to £163bn this year, and we are currently spending over 11% more than we earn in tax revenues.  Our deficit was over £10.8bn in the month of February alone, up £2bn on February 2010. That means we spent £10.8bn more that we generated in tax revenues in February.

So how do we compare to the basket cases of Europe? Ireland had a similar budget deficit of over 11% prior to its collapse; Portugal, whom the EU is bailing out this week had a budget deficit is nearer 8%. So what about our total debt?  How much do we owe? We currently owe £875bn. This is about 60% of our GDP and it is rising. Even with the cuts announced we would still have a budget deficit of £74bn next year.

When the global financial community lose confidence in your ability to pay back your debt then two things happen.  Government bond markets sell off, because less people are interested in buying them, that means that interest rates rise and the value of the currency will fall.

Without the cuts announced we could be facing a very difficult outlook. Interest rates in Portugal and Ireland are now around 8%, double those in the UK and the rest of Europe. Imagine what would happen to the UK economy if mortgage rates doubled. What would happen to house prices, and then the inevitable spiral of bad debts and a further collapse of the UK banks? We are a net importer of almost everything into this country, as the value of the pound falls all prices will rise causing a further squeeze on the economy.

This is why we have to cut government expenditure and reduce the deficit and start to reduce our national debt.

But surely we can raise taxes? Sadly, we have been doing that for the last ten years, but in rather stealthy ways, like congestion charges, stamp duty on housing and national insurance rates. We have to remember that even prior to the financial collapse in 2008, because government borrowing had almost doubled over the previous five years, we were still running a deficit at that time. Now our taxes are some of the highest in the world and we have already instigated emergency tax rises to try and stem the tide.

Unfortunately, raising tax rates often leads to lower tax revenues. A chap called Arthur Laffer proved that in the 1970s (the Laffer Curve) and that’s what led to the Reagan tax cuts in the 1980s. The problem is that we are part of the global economy where companies and increasingly individuals, are free to offer their services from any country in the world.  Often, companies and now individuals will move to base themselves in countries that offer lower tax rates, and it’s happening here.  I personally know of several companies and individuals who have done exactly that in recent years.

We need to encourage wealth creators to stay and work in the UK.  In fact you could, and we should, be arguing that we should be cutting taxes to encourage spending, rather than increasing taxes to fill a hole in the government deficit.

Now some might argue that the government should be spending more money to get us out of this hole. We should, but the government can’t.  They have no money.  They are already spending more than they earn and do we want them be spending more of our money?

However, the most important thing that our government can do is to maintain the support of the global financial community, because if they don’t then interest rates will rise significantly, the currency will fall and we will have one hell of a mess.

So there you have it. The British government is spending more than it earns and has one of the largest deficits in the world, government debt levels are still rising and we need to rein in expenditure, otherwise the global financial community will come knocking on the door and force us to do it, as they have in Greece, Portugal, Ireland and Spain.

It all argues for continued cuts in government expenditure as painful as they may be. However, where you cut is the political decision. Personally I am disappointed that so many young people will be put off going to university by fees of £9000 per annum and I think we need to offer more bursaries to help the poorest get to university.

I promise to write about wine later this week.

Read Mark's Article