Rathfinny Wine Estate

Gin O’clock

Somewhere in the world it must be time for a gin.  It would appear that the rise in popularity of micro breweries and artisan beers has made way for a wave of gin.

Those from Sussex may have seen our glorious white gin bottles in local stores, bars or hotels.  Named after the iconic Seven Sisters but gin from these parts is not a new phenomenon. The land that folds over the top of the Seven Sisters cliffs between Seaford and Birling Gap is knows as Crowlink.  Genuine Crowlink Gin was the drink in the 1800s in London.  It was illegally imported gin which could be legally sold over the bar.  Many landlords even resorted to placing the word Crowlink on their barrels as pure PR to improve sales, even if it wasn’t the real deal.  The smuggling trade was of huge importance in this part of East Sussex and many of the larger houses that adorn the landscape have been ‘funded’ from the illegal import of alcohol.  Ours is not illegal but we do hope it continues to be the gin to drink!

Read Richard's Article

Taxing issues

Dear Mr Hammond

Is it fair or wise to penalise a British industry that is growing and taking on the world? Would we charge higher taxes on Whisky or Scottish woolens than on Vodka or Chinese jumpers? Would we charge higher VAT on British made luxury cars than lower priced ones?

So why do we charge higher rates of Excise Duty on sparkling wine than still wine in the UK?

It’s a little-known fact that we pay 28% more of Excise Duty per bottle on sparkling wine than on still wine – £2.74 and ‘just’ £2.16 respectively. Plus VAT of 20% …

I say ‘just’ because in the rest of Europe Excise Duty on wine is generally 8-10p per bottle! It’s cheaper to buy most wines, even English

Read Mark's Article

Harvest completed

 

We’ve finished our harvest and it was completely wonderful.  Not only did we have a bumper crop, over twice what was harvested last year, but we had so many other things to celebrate.  As Mark mentioned in a previous blog we had a super team of local pickers come and join us.  Mark was away the first morning of harvest so it fell to me to do a rousing, welcoming speech.  

Read Sarah's Article

Who says Brits won’t pick grapes…?

We started harvesting our great crop of wonderful ripe grapes on Monday and since then our team of mostly local workers has picked over 80 tonnes of fruit.

 

I say mostly because we’re very proud to have recruited nearly 100 people from the local area to pick grapes.. something we were told we wouldn’t be able to do. Read this article in The Times, click here. You’d think that the Brits are lazy or that picking fruit is beneath them!

We also have over a dozen people staying in our Flint Barns who have come from further afield: A father and son from Canada and Dubai, and as far away as Aberdeen and Nottingham, Worthing and London.

Read Mark's Article