Rathfinny Wine Estate

Back on a tractor

What with spraying, trimming, spraying, nets to go on, spraying, oh and some more spraying.
It’s been a busy few weeks on the vineyard, and with a man down having a back operation (Ian- get well soon) it’s been all hands to the pump.

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Flowering

Well, the past week really has been something.
I arrived back from a week of Nuffield studies in Canada on Sunday to discover, not only the Vineyard bathed in heat and sunshine but, the first flowers starting to appear. What better time for a heat wave to hit the UK than right at the start of flowering. Normally flowering will drag out over at least a couple of weeks but hopefully not this year.

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Dodging a Bullet

This week has been quite a week for the vineyard. The weather has been a bit of everything; we’ve had sun (always welcome in Spring) rain (which we needed after such a dry month) hail (which we can do without thanks) snow (not now thanks) and the worst of all frost (never welcome)

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Pruning

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We’re just about half-way through pruning, which is pretty good going considering we’re just at the end of January.

We’ve been lucky and have had a marvellous run with the weather during this month; lots of cold frosty days that make for perfect pruning weather.

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Nuffield Farming Scholarship

Instead of the usual musings on the weather, and what is going on in the vineyard it was suggested that I write about my Nuffield Farming Scholarship.

So what’s it all about?
The Nuffield Farming Scholarships Trust award approximately 20 individuals each year with the opportunity to research topics of interest in either farming, food, horticulture and rural industries, or to certain individuals who are in a position to influence these rural industries.

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Summer, yes actually a summer

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I often write about the weather, and it’s hard not to be obsessed by the weather when it controls everything we do in the vineyard.
Although June was fairly ordinary this year, at least we’ve had a summer and it looks like it may continue for a while yet.
It’s not just us though; global temperatures for the first seven months of 2016 have smashed yet more records, suggesting we are on track for the world’s hottest year on record

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Fine weather for Wimbledon- who’d have thought

Flowering in the vineyard is such a wonderful time, it can bring a lot of stress and worry, with one eye constantly on the weather but once it is complete we can finally see just how much fruit we will have this year.

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Sure we can do bud counts at pruning, shoot counts early in the season, and inflorescence counts once the flowers are visible but it’s not until the vine has actually set its fruit for the year that we can get a true idea of that years crop.
The weather at flowering is critical to production in vineyards, and luckily this year it’s been pretty good. June, although warm was fairly ordinary with rain regularly throughout the month, in fact we had 18 days of rain. By chance the rain stopped just in time for the beginning of flowering.  So far most varieties and blocks are well into flowering with some near completion.

So what does flowering in a vineyard look like?

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One week and counting…

With the 9th International Cool Climate Wine Symposium less than a week away, preparations are coming to an end, and the final touches are being added.
This time around England is hosting the Symposium in Brighton, bringing together the great and the good of wine, viticulture, and wine business to share ideas and meet with others in the wine industry.

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Oregon, just like England only different

Each year the Oregon Winegrowers hold their annual symposium in Portland. The symposium is comprised of two full days of panel discussions and presentations covering the most relevant topics in viticulture, oenology and wine business. In addition to this it also hosts the Northwest’s largest wine industry trade show.

This year I was lucky enough to attend the symposium as well as spend a day visiting vineyards in the Willamette Valley. For those of you who aren’t up to speed with Oregon wine this is prime Pinot Noir country.

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Pruning 101

Finally it’s starting to feel like winter.

We’re getting frosty starts, and colder days, still plenty of rainy one’s too but we’re managing to work around those.

This winter we have almost 240,000 vines to prune, which is no small task.

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Pinot Gris or is it Pinot Blanc or is it Pinot Noir?

Now that the harvest is complete, and we look ahead to pruning it’s a fairly quiet time of year in the vineyard, which gives us time to reflect on the season just past.

One of the interesting moments of this year’s harvest was when we discovered a harlequin grape in the Pinot Gris. I have often seen a vine that has produced different coloured grapes on the same vine, and plenty of times even in the same bunch but this was the first time I’d seen different colours in the same berry!

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Harvest. No time to stop.

Just a quick blog this time, as we’re right in the middle of harvest and everything is looking good so far.

Tonnages are up on predictions, and we have a fabulous crew of pickers who are all local and from all walks of life. Special thanks to them they’ve been doing a great job, with many expressing an interest in coming back in future years for pruning and further work over next summer. Its great to have such a happy English speaking crew who despite the miles they put in each day always have a smile on their faces.

I’ll let the pictures do the rest of the talking.

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And counting….

As I sit here writing this blog, it’s raining outside in biblical proportions, 37mm of rain this morning on top of the 25mm we had last night. The winery drains are flooding, the vineyard is too wet to drive a tractor on, in fact there are rivers running down some rows- I thought this was summer?

Now that flowering is well and truly over it’s time to start our first part of yield estimations. Bunch counts, which is actually just as it sounds, counting bunches is hardly the most riveting job, but is a good way to get a decent estimation of what fruit we have hanging on the vines. It’s also an interesting way to see the variability between the individual clones and their different growth habits. We have 10 different clones in the Pinot Noir alone, and the differences are quite marked.

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Summer has finally arrived!

I say that summer has finally arrived with a tone of caution. It was only earlier last week that we had a northerly wind blowing and it felt like we were back in winter.

The vineyard is starting to actually look like a real grown up vineyard now, with lots of lush growth. So much so that we have to thin out some of the shoots, in a process believe it or not we call ‘shoot thinning’.

Shoot thinning is the first stage of canopy management in the growing season- not including pruning of course. Each year once the vines start to grow, they send out shoots from the buds that we laid down when pruning.

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