Rathfinny Wine Estate

What a week!

We are just starting to recover from a fabulous but ‘oh so busy’ planting week, which saw us all up at 4.30 am last Monday – yes, including the teenagers – waiting for the sun to rise in time to film BBC Breakfast.  There was a sense of great expectation as we nursed hot cups of tea in the chilly, breaking dawn and then it was all hands on deck.

Volker and his family, ably assisted by Cameron and our newest member of the team, David, got to work planting the vines in even, GPS directed rows and Mark set to with the media.  Nikki, Liz, Georgia (have I told you I had PA envy and have now got one of my own? – my long suffering friend, Georgia) and I made more cups of tea, ferried the press to and from Polegate station and around the farm and that was really how it was all week, with a few family ‘must-do’s’ thrown in like the obligatory holiday dentist trips and forced revision sessions.

It culminated on Saturday in the most fantastic way with close friends and local villagers joining us to plant their own individual vines and to share in a hog roast.  The ‘close friends’ were roped in, along with all the kids and their respective partners, in making the day a great success.  The video below says it all.

There are too many people to thank but (yet another old friend) Mary Jackson was our artist in residence that week, sketching and painting(http://www.newenglishartclub.co.uk/artists_pages/jackson_mary.asp?art=58) and Jenny of Complete Bliss (www.completebliss.net) (yes, you guessed it – another close friend) provided amazing food on the day, Liz (“run ragged”) who did a fantastic job all week keeping everyone fed and watered and Nikki, Cameron’s wife, who made teas and coffees whilst ferrying her kids to school and back, and was generally a rock all week – thank you one and all.

Sarah Driver

A selection of photos from Saturday.

PS… Please send any other photos of the planting party day to Liz atinfo@rathfinnyestate.com

Read Sarah's Article

Forget the vineyard launch…we have started The Great Reptile Translocation!

Gosh, it’s hard to get a blog in edgeways these days, what with the world’s media descending on us last week to celebrate the planting of our first vineyard and everything. It was such a shame that they missed the really big story… the great reptile translocation. Now, for those of you who are wondering what on earth I am talking about and for those of you who have never had to haul/drag your sorry selves through the agony of the planning process, I will enlighten you.

A reptile translocation is what happens when your planning officers tell you to get an ecological survey done on your building site and you then let an ecology consultancy loose on it . Not satisfied with the lack of bats and the with no sign of the Great Crested Newt the consultants managed, after a rather lengthy and expensive amount of site surveying, to find evidence of two (not one or three but two) Common Newts. According to the BBC Science and Nature website, the COMMON Newt is actually the most COMMON in Europe, I suppose that’s why they call it the COMMON Newt. It is protected under some obscure Wildlife and Countryside Act written in 1981 (and obviously never reviewed) and is no longer on the endangered species list an is, and this might come as a surprise, apparently really COMMON. Well, cutting a long story and much red tape short we, as nature lovers, are having to find and relocate these delightful little creatures to our conservation area in the west of the farm before we can build our winery.

Now I’ll bet your wondering how this is done….smoke, mirrors and slight of hand? CCTV? Alligator Traps? No, it is done with roofing felt. 10 squares of roofing felt get dotted about the site and every morning our designated reptile translocation officers, William and Bridget from the village, take it in turns to lift the felts and catch any lizards before they wake up and get out of bed and move them west. Apparently roofing felt keeps the ground warm and they snuggle under for a kip.

There was much excitement here yesterday as we lay the felts and launched the start of our reptile translocation, though I was slightly disappointed to find the press were not attendance. Today was our first official felt lifting and ……quelle surprise not a newt to be seen? Well only another 59 days to go before we are in the ecological clear.

Just between you and me I’d recommend employing locally, William and Bridget are a bargain and much cheaper than the alternative quote to relocate our 2 newts which came in at £6,800..can you believe it, that’s £3,400 a newt! No wonder this country is going bust!!

rathfinnyestate.posterous-23

Our high spec/tech newt catching device

By Liz O’Neill (run ragged)

Read Liz's Article

Vine Planting Progress

Two days in and 24,000 vines have been planted.

We planted the Riesling in what we know is the warmest spot on the first field to be planted. We also planted the Pinot Meunier and we started planting some Pinot Noir today (Tuesday). We will be planting Pinot Noir all tomorrow and then move onto the Chardonnay on Thursday and Friday.

We have had some great media coverage of the whole event. I just hope we can get the message out that England is making world class sparkling wine and we should be demanding it in restaurants and bars around the world.

The BBC did a nice feature on us. This required a 5am start, that’s why I look so cold!!

My son Archie tried to convince the presenter Stephanie McGovern to create a viral hit and fall over whilst on live TV.  She almost bought it, until he added ‘then you could get up speaking a different language’. No chance…

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-17509313

And Richard Hemming from JancisRobinson.com posted a great clip on YouTube.

Just one correction the row width is 2.2m and 1.1m between the vines.

rathfinnyestate.posterous-24

Cameron has been working very hard as has Liz.

rathfinnyestate.posterous-25

The vine planting machine in full flow.

All we need now is a little rain next week to bed them all in.

Read Mark's Article

The Vines have arrived…

Hooray… The vines have arrived and it is all systems go for planting on Monday.

rathfinnyestate.posterous-26

A very arty picture of some of them ready for planting. (Cameron Roucher)

My brother asked if they had been painted? They haven’t been, it is a green wax used to protect them whilst they are in store and also during the early years. We hoped that the wax will deter rabbits from attacking them.

The look good don’t they?

 

Read Liz's Article

Am I the only one praying for rain?

Last year my eldest son worked as a court coverer at Wimbledon. You know the guys, and they are mainly guys, who drag the covers over the courts at the slightest speck of rain. He has managed to wangle himself back again this year and because the Olympic tennis tournament is being held at Wimbledon he will be working for the whole of June, July and most of August. The court coverers would pray for the threat of rain, they would be on alert and would have to sit at the back of the court just in case their services were needed. It’s a tough job watching tennis! When no rain was forecast his job was less glamorous. They were on clean up duty or he would have to hold an umbrella to provide shade for the tennis players during breaks in play. Wouldn’t you pray for rain, or at least the threat of it?

I feel like a court coverer at Wimbledon. We have completed all our preparation for our first vine planting at Rathfinny. We have carefully prepared the soil, adding fertilisers and turning in the mustard cover crop that we planted to raise the humus levels. We have planted over 2500 trees as wind breaks. We have bought all our vineyard equipment, tractors and trailers, post bashers and wire dispensers. We have even taken delivery of 18,000 trellising posts and the 27,000km of wire we will need to layout after planting, enough to take us half way round the world.

The vines arrive tomorrow. The planting machine will be here on Sunday 25th March ready to start planting on the Monday. The sense of excitement is building. All the preparation has been done. It all starts for real in just three days time. Except for one thing. One crucial thing is missing. Water. We need rain and ideally 10mm per week for the next 40 weeks!

I’m not a religious person, my Catholic mother did enough praying to last us all a lifetime. However, perhaps I should be. Or at least I should learn a rain dance, because if we don’t get rain this spring and early summer those vines, which have been given such a wonderful start and opportunity in life, will really struggle.

Over the last 20 years we have averaged nearly 800mm of rain a year at Rathfinny. However, last year we had only 600mm and 150mm of that fell in December! Overall it was a very dry autumn and winter. So we are facing a drought in southeast England and hosepipe bans.

One thing you learn when investing is that when a story is on the front page it is already “old” news, and the issue has peaked. I am hoping that the stories in the papers two weeks ago threatening hosepipe bans are a good sign. I am hoping Cameron (our vineyard manager) is right and we will get 10mm per week for the rest of the year. I just hope April showers turn into a normal English summer -warm and wet.

So am I worried? I’ve cracked and I’m learning a rain dance….

rathfinnyestate.posterous-27

A view of the first area at Rathfinny to be planted next week.

Just for the record in 2011:

Eastbourne Weather data – (just 6 miles from Rathfinny)

Eastbourne recorded an average temperature of 12.3°C in 2011 (compared to the long term average of 10.5°C), which is thought to be the highest annual average on record. The previous highest in recent years was 12.2°C in 2006 and 12.1 in 2002 and 1990.

Apart from April when temperatures were unusually warm (average temperature 13.2°C compared with the long term average of 8.7°C) the year was not exceptionally warm however average maximum and minimum temperatures were slightly above average in May, June, October, November and December which probably accounts for the high overall average temperature.

Up until the end of November, the total rainfall was exceptionally low (436mm) however above average rainfall in December brought the annual total to 630.3mm which is nevertheless still low compared to the long term average of 795mm. Despite this, there were higher than average rain-days, 175 compared with long term average of 161.

The total annual sunshine was 1950 hours compared to a long term average of 1828 hours and April had 273.9 hours compared with a long term average of 181 hours; this was just short of the all time record of 274.3 hours in 1893.

Eastbourne remained the sunniest place in the UK in 2011.

rathfinnyestate.posterous-28

A closer view of the area to be planted next week.

Read Mark's Article

Countdown to planting – 1 week to go

“I drink champagne when I’m happy and when I’m sad.  Sometimes I drink it when I’m alone. When I have company I consider it obligatory.  I trifle with it if I’m not hungry and drink it when I am. Otherwise, I never touch it – unless I’m thirsty.

Madame Bollinger, quoted in the Daily Telegraph.

Here’s a scary thought.  Although most Champagne houses were established by mad men, they end up being run by their spouses!  Bollinger, Verve Clicquot and Pommery to name but a few.  Watch out!

I am sneaking in a quick blog before next week’s planting and all the experts take over with talk about vines and temperatures and GPS planting – watch this space!

In anticipation of this great event, we have had our pictures taken.  This involved Liz and I waking at 6am to decide whether we were going ‘country’ or ‘executive’ – suffice it to say, we look neither!  A lovely photographer, Ben (female) arrived to be toId by me that “I hate my photo being taken and I’m really un-photogenic.”  Everyone says that, she answered with a laugh.  An hour or so later, she was trying to remain enthusiastic.  “Would you like to borrow my lipstick?” she asked.  “Really? That bad?”  She grimaced.  “Don’t you do make up?” she enquired, to which I informed her that, for me, I had so much make-up on that Mark had looked slightly twitchy when I appeared first thing in the morning.  Anyway, Ben has promised that I will look gorgeous and about 23, so I’m feeling very relaxed about the results – not!

It has been a succession of contracts and quotes over the past few weeks, with our main quote to all our consultants reiterating that we will not be earning anything until at least 2016 and so can they take the pain with us.  Not a desperately compelling argument, but one which most (I am happy to say) seem to accept, mainly it seems because of the sheer excitement and enthusiasm wine seems to evoke.  (At this point, I thank them all from the bottom of my heart, if not my purse, and promise that when we are seeing the profits of our work, they too, will see them flow their way.)

Promised a trip to South Africa, shallow as I am, the thought of a holiday in the sun with a book by a pool, ensured that I immediately became suddenly keen on the whole wine business.  It was not to be that quiet, relaxing trip of self indulgence.  I have to say though, I had the most fantastic time, despite inspecting 15 different wineries and I mean, really inspecting down to the drainage system, the benefits of different types of tanks and I can even tell you what the different stages of treating waste water are.  I have our charming and ever patient consultant, Gerard De Villiers (don’t even think of building a winery without asking this man!) to thank.

rathfinnyestate.posterous-29

Mark and Gerard inspecting waste water treatment at Hidden Valley

We were completely bowled over by the generosity of the wine people over there.  In particular, Louis Strydom, winemaker from Ernie Els (my favourite tasting experience), Cathy Grier Brewer from Villiera who supply M&S, Morne Very the wine maker at the exquisite Delaire Graff Estate and Pieter Ferreira at Graham Beck who graciously gave us two hours of his time after a sleepless night on a busy, picking day. Thank you all.

rathfinnyestate.posterous-30

The view from Ernie Els Winery

Wine – How Hard Can It Be?

I have decided to do a simple section every so often on my learning experience.  As the TV says, for those of you who know even a bit about wine, turn away from the screen now.  I am a complete beginner, so this will not be for you and will only be humiliating for me!

Here’s what I’ve learnt so far from my first experience of tasting wine, in South Africa.

  • There are many different grapes which give wines their different tastes. (I told you I knew nothing!)
  • Often, these different grapes are mixed together in different amounts – blended.
  • Chardonnay – I like this and learnt to recognise that it has a ‘smoky’ flavour, brought about by being aged (stored) in barrels of oak.
  • Oak – US oak gives vanilla flavours, French oak gives a different flavour, but I can’t remember what!  (I heard someone say this, but Mark says it’s completely wrong!  He says American oak grows more quickly and therefore the grain gives a more pronounced flavour, whilst French oak tends to have ‘tighter’ grains and is therefore more subtle. Confused?!
  • Sauvignon Blanc – I didn’t like it, describing it rather proudly as having a ‘vinegar taste,’ – which didn’t go down terribly well with the lady serving it!

Right.  Time to stop.  I’m feeling incredibly excited but also nervous about the next few weeks. Having vines growing in the ground will make this project so much more real and will be a daily reminder of the changes we have undertaken in our lives.

Sarah

Read Sarah's Article