Rathfinny Wine Estate

Wine tasting and more

Sarah, better known as ‘Crushed Grape,’ here – I know I am completely rubbish at this.  Last week, tired at the end of a long day, we went out for a drink and I ordered my favourite tipple. Mark leans towards me, I lean back, and he says, “What does it taste like?”  “That’s easy,” I think replying, “English sparkling wine” – actually, that’s a lie, I still say Champagne, but I’m learning!  He tries again patiently, “break it down,” he adds to which I churlishly reply, “I don’t want to, I just want to enjoy it!”

This is not the first time I have had this experience.  I am the one at a wine tasting who drinks most of the first glass in one go, pulls a face and is about to say something horrid only to look around and see smiles and joy as others talk of “the sensation of mousse” – salmon or chocolate I wonder?  While others talk of hints of honey and shortbread, I wander into thoughts along the lines of …. I haven’t had shortbread since I made a burnt batch at school, and didn’t we make rock cakes too then as well?  Who makes either of them anymore?  I then get completely absorbed in remembering things like cheese straws, which I loved and pineapple upside down cake which I didn’t, only to find I’ve now drunk 3 glasses and am none the wiser. I’ve said it before, I like what I like and I quickly know what I don’t.

Things I have learnt – to be skipped over by those in the know and that will hopefully redeem me in my husband’s eyes.

  • France has Champagne, which it jealously guards as a name and has protected status
  • Italy has Prosecco
  • Spain has Cava
  • What does England have?  English sparkling wine!

To be honest, I never knew the difference, thinking Champagne was the real thing and everything else was somehow inferior.  But, as we know with Ridgeview winning the prized Decanter award, taking it from the Champagne region for the first time, as well as multiple other awards being won in England, that is not the case.

Forgive me for keeping this simple – it’s how I think.

Champagne and English Sparkling Wine is made using the traditional method.  What this means is that the wine is fermented once in a steel tank and then again, when yeast and sugar are added in the bottle, which provides the fizz.   This gives a more ‘complex’ flavour than say Prosecco which is fermented in tanks in a shorter space of time, with more sugar. (I don’t follow much more than this as Mark talks of ‘yeast’ and I think of Marmite.)

Experiment  – this I can recommend as it involves having to drink a bottle of both Prosecco and English Sparkling wine while pretending to be carrying out research!  “Look at the bubbles in Prosecco,” says Mark, “they are larger, more uneven and don’t last as long as compared to those in the English Sparkling wine/Champagne glass” He looks up to see if I am following.  “It’s true!  I can see it,” pleased with my success.  The only problem is, the glass never stays full enough for long enough to be more exact than that.

Feeling quite pleased with my new found knowledge – more soon!

Read Sarah's Article

Windbreaks and Grape Quality

We were all a bit shocked by events in Christchurch, though luckily Liz’s family are all safe.  Liz has been saying for months that they were expecting another big earthquake, but I am not sure that they expected it to be right under the city centre.

I wanted tell you about the trees we have planted because, as any walker knows, wind has a material effect on temperature.  I was reading this week that winds as low at 11-14km/h can significantly affect the temperature in a vineyard.  As I have been explaining in previous blogs, Rathfinny benefits from have a ridge of the South Downs, just to the south of us, which will shield us from the worst of the prevailing SW winds.  However, the fields are still exposed to winds blowing up and down the Rathfinny valley and up the Cuckmere valley.  So we decided we needed to plant three windbreaks on the first parcel of land destined for grapes, set 270 metres apart.  It’s a tricky business to decide where and how many to plant.  The theory is that you get a 60% reduction in wind speed at distances of up to 10 times the height of the tree.  So assuming these trees grow to 15 metres then we will get a 60% reduction in wind speeds 150 metres away.  However, you still get 10% reduction some 300m away.  And then the next line of trees has the effect of lifting the wind again over the next windbreak.

The fact is that some wind in the vineyard is good news.  Wind helps dry out the leaves and fruit after rain and so reducing humidity and disease risk.  However, wind also lowers temperatures and can close the stomata on the bottom of the leaves, which reduces photosynthesis and respiration.  It’s a balancing act.  Disturb the wind but don’t reduce it so much that we increase the risk of disease.

The Met office data we have shows that although we may experience average winds over the site of 13.6 km/h during whole the year, during the growing season, April – October, we only experience average wind speeds of 12 km/h.  The critical times are flowering in May/June and the ripening period called Veraison, from the end of July onwards.

We thought it was important to plant native trees, so we’ve gone for a mix of broadleaf species that grow well in chalky soil and exposed sites: Ash, Beech, Field Maple and Hawthorn. We resisted planting some of the faster growing varieties like Italian Alder and Eucalyptus principally because they are not native and because they don’t like chalk. Hopefully these windbreaks will help break-up the wind and increase the average temperature in the vineyard so increasing fruit quality.

We have also set up a weather station on the land and we are now collecting weather data from six different monitors at Rathfinny. If you are interested you can see the Rathfinny weather station on line at http://www.weatherlink.com/user/rathfinny/

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Dylan Inspecting the windbreak. Bless him he carried that log all over the farm!

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A windbreak running North-South, showing the slope in front of the land that protects us form the worst of the prevailing SW winds and the Cuckmere Valley to the left.

Read Mark's Article